Sunday, April 29, 2012

Penn. Marcellus News Update, 4/29/12

Pipeline project delayed
The Atlantic Access Pipeline Project, which when built will cross Somerset and Bedford counties on its path through southern Pennsylvania, will be ready for service in 2015, rather than the 2014 date announced late last year, a company spokesman said.

“This delay is a result of historically low natural gas prices,” said Christopher Stockton, spokesman for Transco, a division of Williams Co. Inc. of Houston. “Natural gas producers who are interested in moving gas on the pipeline have expressed to us that they would be better served by a 2015 in-service date rather than a 2014 service date.”
 Pennsylvania boom shows Ohio what might be ahead
The director of the Williamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Commerce said he has never seen an economic boom like the one sweeping north-central Pennsylvania.
“I’ve been in good times and bad times, obviously. I’ve never seen anything that’s had the economic development impact this has and the job creation,” said Vincent Matteo, who has spent more than 30 years in development work. (emphasis added).
For the past few weeks, contractors have swarmed the natural gas well site next to the Bear Fuel service station on state Route 118 in Columbia County.
This time, they were filling instead of drilling.
Bear Fuel employee John Leshko was close enough that he could watch the contractors pulling up the pipes and well casing. On Wednesday, they covered the area where a drilling rig once stood with sheets of metal...
Geologists say the unproductive part of the Marcellus Shale extends beyond the coal region, where the high temperatures that hardened the anthracite "cooked" the natural gas out of the shale. The latest in a series of unproductive wells confirms experts' beliefs that producing natural gas in the region may be nothing more than a pipe dream.
Riches or ruins? Lessons from Barnett Shale (video)
They live on top of the Barnett Shale, a dense formation rich in natural gas that stretches beneath 5,000 square miles of 24 counties in North Central Texas. The Barnett Shale formation became the hottest play in the nation a decade ago. It's thought to be the largest natural gas field in the country.
Since then, the Greens have been living on top of what some see as a gold mine and others a curse. Money has rolled in, towns have been revitalized and the nation has seen natural gas reserves increase for the first time in 20 years. But some say the price is too high, citing health concerns, demolished roads, water contamination and depletion, and battles over property rights.
1. Range Resources...
2. Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection...
3. Chesapeake Energy...
4. Marcellus Shale Coalition...
5. PennFuture...
6. Pennsylvania Independent Oil & Gas Association...
7. Pennsylvania Environmental Council...
8. Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension...
9. Cabot Oil & Gas...
10. Landowners groups...
For the 30-plus years that attorney Joseph Persico practiced real estate law, he saw little activity with oil and gas leases.
After the birth of the Marcellus Shale natural gas industry, that has changed.
The Marcellus Shale boom has pushed attorneys throughout Northeast Pennsylvania to practice oil and gas law after years of specializing in other areas.

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